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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation found in the catalog.

Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation

Robert J. Ross

Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation

by Robert J. Ross

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  • 6 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, WI (One Gifford Pinchot Dr., Madison 53705-2398) .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Oak -- Diseases and pests -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRobert J. Ross, James C. Ward, Anton TenWolde
    SeriesResearch paper FPL -- RP-512, Research paper FPL -- 512
    ContributionsWard, J. C, TenWolde, A., Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13614218M

      Stress wave is a sound wave produced manually, in a complex mixture of frequencies,,. Instead of using sensor to generate waves, in the stress wave approach, raw data is the sound of a hammer tapping on one pin to each other pin, that are inserted into the xylem. This technique requires minimally invasive, as pins are inserted a few. Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation / Robert J. Ross, James C. Ward, Anton TenWolde. Madison, WI: United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory,

    Identifying bacterially infected wood by stress wave non-destruc-tive evaluation. FPL-RP, USDA Forest Service, Madison. Nondestructive Evaluation of Materials and Compositie, SPIE Schmoldt, D.L., M. Morrone and J.C. Duke. Ultrasonic inspection of .   The time it takes for the wave to travel between sensors is used to compute wave propagation speed. Stress wave NDE methods are commonly used in industrial applications for testing the properties of both wood and non-wood products. Ross et al. [8] found that this ND E technique could correctly identify 84 percent of wetwood red oak lumber.

    Cork oak. See also what's at Wikipedia, your library, or elsewhere.. Broader term: Oak; Used for: Cork-tree; Quercus suber; Filed under: Cork oak The planting and growing of cork oak trees in the United States, (Baltimore, Md., Research dept., Crown cork & seal company, inc., c), by Giles Buckner Cooke and inc Crown cork and seal company (page images at HathiTrust). Stress wave timing nondestructive evaluation tools for inspecting historic structures: a guide for use and interpretation. Author Ross, Robert J. (Robert Jon) Published Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation. Author Ross, Robert J. (Robert Jon) Published.


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Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation by Robert J. Ross Download PDF EPUB FB2

Identifying Bacterially Infected Oak by Stress Wave Nondestructive Evaluation Robert J. Ross, Supervisory General Engineer James C. Ward, Research Forest Products Technologist Anton TenWolde, Supervisory Research Physicist Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Wetwood is an abnormal type of heartwood.

Lumber. Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation. Madison, WI (One Gifford Pinchot Dr., Madison ): U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors.

Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation. (AGR:IND) Abstract Citations; Related Articles; Data; BioEntities; External Links ' ' Ross RJ, ' ' Ward JC, ' ' TenWolde A Research Paper RM - U.S.

Department of Agriculture, Forest Serivce, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation / Robert J. Ross, James C. Ward, Anton TenWolde. By Robert J. (Robert Jon) Ross. Abstract. 6 p. Topics: Oak--Diseases and pests--United States.

Author: Robert J. (Robert Jon) Ross. Patton-Mallory and De Groot Static Bending, Transverse Vibration, and Longitudinal Stress Wave Nondestructive Evaluation Methods Elvery and Nwokoye () Several 11 () - Red oak.

[5] Robert JR, James CW, Anton T. Identifying Bacter ially Infected Oak By Stress Wave Nondestructive Evaluation. Forest Products Laboratory. ; FPL-RP The elm wood samples were tested by the technique of stress wave, and the testing results were analyzed by using the statistic software of SPSS. The results showed that the moister content of wood, wood crack, the sizes of holes and numbers of holes have significant influence on propagation parameters and dynamic modulus of elasticity.

Under the same specifications, the propagation time of. Identifying bacterially. infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a stress wave nonde­ structive evaluation.

Hardwood Symp NDE of green material with stress waves: preliminary results using dimension lumber. Forest Prod Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation Jan Identifying Bacterially Infected Oak by Stress Wave Nondestructive Evaluation USDA Forest Service Research Paper FPL-RP, dated Mar.

NDE of Green Material With Stress Waves: preliminary results using dimension lumber, Forest Products Journal, dated Aug. Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation the technique was less effective on white oak, correctly identifying an average of 45 per-cent of the infected.

Possible generalizations of the methods developed in the book are discussed. Evaluation of original physical parameters from solutions of the inverse problems is described. (ed.): Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation: Engineering and Biological Material Characterization.

J.C., TenWolde, A.: Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress. to determine the effectiveness of a stress wave nonde­ structive evaluation (NDE) technique to detect the presence of wetwood, thereby allowing separation of bacterially infected and noninfected lumber before kiln-drying.

On average, this NDE technique correctly identified 84 percent of bacterially infected red oak. Ross R J, Ward J C, TenWolde A (). Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation. Madison: Forest Products Laboratory, Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, USA.

Google Scholar. Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest ProAcknowledgements ducts Laboratory, Res. Pap. FPL-RP We thank Dr.

Duane Zinkel of the Forest Products Laboratory for Scalbert, A. NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF GREEN DEFECT-PRONE RED OAK LUMBER: A PILOT STUDY ROBER T J.

Ross JAME S J. FULLER JOH N R. DRAMM ABSTRACT Honeycomb and surface checks are lumber drying defects that can go undetected and result in considerable losses during further processing of the lumber into products.

1. Introduction. Stress wave tomography technique has been widely used in non-destructive testing of wood. Ross et al. () first time introduced stress wave detection technology on red oak decayed area for testing.

The image observed by the stress wave imaging software could indicate the rotten wood’s interior location, size and extent of decay (Gilbert and Smiley et al., ).

Pages in Proceedings of the 7th International Nondestructive Testing of Wood Symposium, September 29,Madison WI, Conference and Institute, Washington State University.

Ross, R.J., Ward, J.C., and Tenwolde, A. Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave non-destructuve evaluation. It is difficult to identify live trees infected with bacteria unless some external indicators such as fluxing of bacterial metabolic products occur through wounds in the bark.

and A. Tenwolde. Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave nondestructive evaluation. Res. Pap. FPLRP USDA Forest Serv., Forest Prod.

Lab. Verkasalo and others () and Ross and others () have shown encouraging results when using stress wave techniques to identify bacterially infected red oak.

They found that speed of sound transmission perpendicular to the grain was significantly slower. Identifying bacterially infected oak by stress wave.

assistance, materials, and facilities to conduct this study at their plant in Bangor, Wis. This. nondestructive evaluation. Res. Pap. FPL-RP-paper was received for publication in March USDA Forest Serv., Forest Prod.

Lab., Madi-Forest Products Society son, Wis. 6 pp.Identifying Bacterially Infected Oak by Stress Wave Nondestructive Evaluation. A FPL - RP - Strength of Bolted Timber Connections with Steel Side Members.Stress-wave nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques were used to lo­ e Laboratory study of bacterially infected lumber.

– Ross, Soltis, and Otton. Consequently, baseline information on speed of stress-wave transmission in live oak was needed before us­.